Saturday, September 06, 2014

Idaho Centennial Trail - Part 3 - Idaho Point to Wallace, Idaho


From Idaho Point, Mountain Tops seemed to stretch into Forever. 


The grass is always greener syndrome can also apply to looking at other mountains in the distance from one's current mountain location.  However, one soon learns that whatever comes into sight of mind becomes us, and is Becoming, and even Nourishing, when we truly let it In. Distance, location, and space seemingly vanish when the Heart is Open to the energy that one focuses upon.


One merely draws the Beauty within. Two Points become One. Duality ends into a Singularity.


The Trout Creek National Recreation Trail brought us through Higher Country and yet more snow. However, where were the people? It's as if we were exploring a brand new planet whose only inhabitants were Wildlife.


Herds of Elk taught us some of the Indigenous Customs.


They taught us over and over again how to make your own Way when there was no pre-established trail to follow.  Going Cross-Country and trusting in the Unknown is essential in one's personal development and Self discovery. One eventually learns that all compasses point inward towards the center of Being.


Blossom Lake and its reflections showed us how a family whose children loved to jump fearlessly onto floating logs.  If one can find the child within and yet hold the wisdom of an Elder, then anything is truly possible.


At Pear Lake, we noticed we were yet again following a Lone Wolf and its tracks for miles. It brought us to a tree where Lightening must have struck just days before.  Fresh wood shards and its splinters flew in all directions on top of the snow. This was truly a symbol for power and inspiration that comes from connecting the positive with the negative or the yang with the yin.  Its priceless currency delivers vitality, strength, health, and well being.


Looking Over the Glidden Lakes, we knew we were once more close to civilization. The mining towns of Mullan and Wallace on Interstate 90 were close at foot.  Soon, the public would be smelling what we had Learned.

~

2 comments:

  1. Bernie, I love trekking with you all on your hikes. Those elk! How magnificent!

    And were the children beavers who were floating those logs to build a dam?

    Just so beautiful. You need to work for National Geo!

    xo

    Sheila :-)

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  2. It is such a pleasure to take in these journeys through your eyes, and read your words. You are indeed exploring virgin lands and the depths of the inner being within.

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